We walk alone

We Walk Alone front cover. The bottom two-thirds of the cover contains an outdoors scene with a blond woman in the foreground, right of the image. Her back is facing the reader and she is seen from her calves up, wearing a satin nightgown, its top part lowered to her lower back, exposing most of her back and her shoulders. Through the garment, her bare skin is seen, on buttocks and legs. Her back is arched to her front left, head bowed and also turned to her left. Her arms are in front of her, almost invisible to the reader. Her hair is long and wavy and is seen hanging in front of her left shoulder. In the background of the image, the sky with many clouds can be seen, partially covering a mountain. Directly in front of the woman trees can also be seen, and a marble or stone gazebo surrounded by more trees and by haze. The top third of the cover has a yellow background with the title and description.
http://ec.msvu.ca:8080/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10587/884/LPF-We Walk Alone-Back.jpg

Title

We walk alone

Creator

Date

Description

Journalistic portraits of lesbian subcultures in and around New York

Is Part Of

Relation

This book is part of a series.
We Walk Alone (1955)
We Two Must Love (1958)
We Too Won't Last (1963)
Take a Lesbian to Lunch (1972)

Table Of Contents

Who is she? --
How did she get that way? --
Looking backward --
Types and stereotypes --
Keep it gay! --
Gay Paris --
Cocktails at Kitty's --
Discretion --
Love that dares not tell its name --
The bisexual --
Unconscious homosexuality --
There's a law against it! --
Can a lesbian be cured? --
Here comes the bride --
A word to parents --
Looking forward.

Printing location

Cover Artist

Author Identity

Author Gender / Sexual Orientation

Publisher Type

Physical Dimensions

143 pages
18 cm

Reviews

Damon, Gene. "Aldrich Walks Alone." Ladder, vol. 1, no. 9, June 1957, p. 16-18.

The debate on Ann Aldrich's controversial book, "We Walk Alone" (Fawcett Publications, 1955) during the May public discussion turned into a one-sided affair, the contention being that for all Miss Aldrich's good intentions she did not achieve her purpose and failed to balance her more bizarre examples of Lesbianism with those who have attained adjustment and are useful, productive citizens in today's society.

In upholding the book, Del Martin pointed out that all too many homophile readers were looking for "affirmation" rather than information or a well-rounded picture of Lesbianism, that a true picture must include the negative aspects. She also cited the difficulties encountered in commercial publishing and that most firms demand a pattern that does not condone. The proverbial "unhappy ending" as has been pointed out by many authors who have worked the homosexual theme, is not necessarily in the original copy.

Helen Sanders criticized the author for having lived, as she admits, in "gay life" for 15 years and failing to seek the "cure" she believes possible since she so obviously hates and resents her lot. Miss Sanders also took exception to the title of the book, stating that the isolation and loneliness of the homosexual has been highly exaggerated.

"it is ridiculous to imply that because one is a Lesbian one feels lonely or rejected or lost." She added, "Very many Lesbians live full and rich lives . . ."

Miss Martin quoted from "We Walk Alone" where the author says, "There is no stereotype in the over-all picture of the Lesbian. This is the first discovery I made about the group of which I am a member".

Miss Sanders was quick to point out that Ann Aldrich then proceeds to contradict herself further in the book by placing undue stress on the obvious and bizarre "types" of Lesbians, citing few, if any, of the adjusted ones.

While Miss Sanders felt that Ann Aldrich quoted heavily from medical and psychological authorities who are very biased, Miss Martin suggested that the many quotations from Caprio and others of such mind were somewhat offset by the inclusion of a few good quotes from Dr. Benjamin Karpman.

Miss Sanders felt that the author placed too much emphasis on the lack of finances or low income of the Lesbian (Ann Aldrich cites this factor as being the main reason the Lesbian, as a rule, does not seek therapy). The speaker felt that many Lesbian had very good positions - of responsibility and remuneration. Miss Martin concurred with Miss Aldrich, however, in that the male is better paid - homophile or heterophile. Many women receive their reward in title rather than in money, Miss Martin pointed out.

The chapter on the various state laws in the United States pertaining to homosexuality was conceded by both speakers to be of considerable value. However, both took exception to Miss Aldrich's conclusion that since most Lesbians are never affected by encounters with law enforcement agencies they need not be concerned too much. It has always been the contention of the Daughters of Bilitis that all those of the homosexual minority (Ladder, Volume 1, Number 3, December 1956) should be apprised of a citizen's rights in case of arrest and as a group should be concerned where there are instances of infringement on civil rights. The DOB is also watching with interest the progress of the Model Penal Code now being drafted by the American Law Institute.

It was generally agreed that Miss Aldrich "tried", that there is a valid contribution to Lesbian literature (of which there is so little) if not taken to seriously or considered "gospel" by those of limited experience.

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This Book is Discussed in

Meeker, Martin. "A Queer and Contested Medium: The Emergence of Representational Politics in the" Golden Age" of Lesbian Paperbacks, 1955-1963." Journal of Women's History 17.1 (2005): 165-188.

Mitchell, Kaye. "‘Who Is She?" Identities, Intertextuality and Authority in Non-Fiction Lesbian Pulp of the 1950s." Queer 1950s. Palgrave Macmillan, London, 2012. 150-166.

Vigiletti, Elyse. "Normalizing the “Variant” in The Ladder, America's Second Lesbian Magazine, 1956–1963." Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies 36.2 (2015): 47-71.

NODL Evaluation Report

"I did not finish this book- and did not turn down and mark passages. This is the first time I'm stumped as to category. The book is apparently a serious (?) study of a serious sexual abberation [sic]. But why publish it in pocket form if not to appeal to a taste for lurid facts or information. It is certainly not suitable for teenagers & I doubt if the author & publisher are as 'concerned' about lesbians as they proclaim. The author claims to be one. It gets a little pull."

Cover, Front Text

Of the love that dwells in the twilight – 'the love that can never be told!’ We walk alone through Lesbos' lonely groves

Cover, Back Text

"There is a little of the female in every man, and a little of the male in every woman. When the lesser characteristics dominate, the individual is apt to develop a personality that varies and deviates from what we consider normal. Instincts, urges, tastes and desires fall into the pattern of the opposite sex. They are known as homosexuals.

It is a rare thing today to find a spokesman for the female homosexual like Ann Aldrich. With a reporter's eye she sees and reveals the character and personality of the lesbian, her passions and pursuits, her loves and despairs.

Ann Aldrich, herself a member of the sisterhood, shows you, unsparingly, not only her own trials and tribulations, but those of all who live, like her, in the twilight world of the sexes."

She leaves one with the conviction that the lesbian mertits neither pity nor scorn, but only sympathy and understanding.

Dr. Richard H. Hoffman
World famous psychologist

Cover Art Description

The bottom two-thirds of the cover contains an outdoors scene with a blond woman in the foreground, right of the image. Her back is facing the reader and she is seen from her calves up, wearing a satin night gown, its top part lowered to her lower back, exposing most of her back and her shoulders. Through the garment, her bare skin is seen, on buttocks and legs. Her back is arched to her front left, head bowed and also turned to her left. Her arms are in front of her, almost invisible to the reader. Her hair is long and wavy and is seen hanging in front of her left shoulder. In the background of the image, the sky with many clouds can be seen, partially covering a mountain. Directly in front of the woman trees can also be seen, and a marble or stone gazebo surrounded by more trees and by haze. The top third of the cover has a yellow background with the title and description.

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Item Relations

Item: Fawcett Publications Publisher This Item
Item: Meaker, Marijane (Vin Packer, Ann Aldrich) Creator This Item
Item: We two won't last Relation This Item

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Citation

Aldrich, Ann, “We walk alone,” The Lesbian Pulp Fiction Collection @ Mount Saint Vincent University, accessed December 2, 2022, https://msvulpf.omeka.net/items/show/549.